Studebaker Name Revived by Colorado Company

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Studebaker Name Revived by Colorado Company
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There’s a new startup on the horizon, but it bears a familiar nameplate that many Americans will remember, but which few know well.

A company in Arvada, Colorado wants to bring Studebaker back into the modern era with a more diverse product line not restricted to 4-wheel vehicles. Before they went out of business in 1966, Studebaker was actually a revolutionary company, building cars like the Lark (pictured above) that boasted fuel efficiency over the competition’s behemoth-sized vehicles.

The former company had enough foresight to build the world’s first electric car, though such things probably seemed more imaginative than Dianetics do today.

While imagination isn’t a bad thing, it didn’t serve to keep them in business. Regardless, that philosophy seems to have suck for the Arvada company now calling themselves Studebaker Motor Company. Their site features a host of concept renderings ranging from a small car that looks a little like a strange mix between the Chevrolet Sonic and Volkswagen Rabbit to a CUV.

They also have a truck concept and a sedan. Outside the four-wheel realm, Studebaker wants to offer scooters and motorcycles. There are a few bike renderings up on the site that take styling cues from Harley Davidson’s VRSC Nightrod line and Buell’s entry-level Blast bikes. No scooter sketches yet, though the page says it’s coming soon.

As we’ve seen in the past, startup car companies suck up cash faster than an army of vacuum cleaners and Studebaker is still looking for investors. Companies like this rarely go anywhere, but there’s always a chance. We’ll be keeping an eye out for the long shot Colorado company that’s trying to raise the dead.

  • Woodman

    I would be interested, We had a 1949 Studebaker. It was a nice car.

  • Jayson

    I can see why you didn’t include any of the renderings of the new “Studebakers.” They’re so ugly my dog ran and hid his eyes.

    Total disgrace to the memory of the company.

  • Gary

    Well I was born in 1933 so I tell you when I was growing up I can remember the car.To me it was a car in its own class.I knew a lot of people that owned one.It wasn’t the best looking car at that time but it was a reliable car..My dad owned a repair shop at the time and I don’t remember to many of them in the shop for repairs..So all in all I think that there is a good chance that they can make it.

  • Thomas Martin

    I really liked the studebaker lark, they were pretty sleak.

  • Gerald Collier

    I owned a 1951 Studebaker Commander (v8 w/3speed overdrive.)It was a really comfortable car, and just for fun, I took it to the closest local dragstrip and ran it in D-stock. It beat some Ford Crown-vics and Dodges, along with some Plymouths. (couldn’t do much with Chevy’s!) hope the new one are good!

  • guionM

    Luke, perhaps you need to read up on Studebaker a bit more. Studebaker was not a revolutionary company by a long shot after it was the 1st to bring out redesigned cars after WWII. In fact, the final cars they made were on the same chassis that were used nearly 20 years earlier.

    Also, if you reviewed Studebaker history, you’d know that while the 1959 Lark made Studebaker’s automotive division profits (they lost money every other year from the late 50s till they closed), the following year Ford introduced the Compact Lark and GM also jumped into the compact car market, which is what drove the final nail into Studebaker’s coffin.

    SAtudebaker closed down their South Bend plant and moved all operations to their Hamiltion Ont. plant due to both cost and quality advantages. The famous Studebaker Avanti, as great as it looked, had initial horrible quality, and in the mear 2 years it was made, it was a complete failure.

    This new Studebaker company this kid is creating is a farce (“we have no cars, designers, engineers, but we’re almost ready to sell hats and T-shirts??!!”).

    I’m not so much reminded of Bricklin and Delorean (which actually had something to show and a REAL plan) as I am reminded of the “Dale automobile” of the 1970s (if you’ve never heard of the Dale, please read up on it… there was as much enthusiasm over that idea as you seem to have over this guy’s).

  • guionM

    Correction: Ford introduced the 1960 Falcon…. I wrote Lark.