Home / Auto News / News article: Bosch Drowsiness Detection System Offers More Affordable Safety - AutoGuide.com News
 |  Apr 30 2012, 6:45 PM

Systems to detect when a driver might be dozing off aren’t new by any means, but that sort of technology is still in the upper echelons of luxury safety features. Now, automotive technology company Bosch is hoping to change that.

Expensive radar- or camera-based sensors like those used in high-end luxury car systems are one option, but that’s not the route Bosch took to develop its drowsiness detection. Instead, information from the car’s electric power steering system or stability control system is fed through the CAN bus system, found on all cars built in 1996 and later.

As one of the industry’s largest technology suppliers, Bosch has the capability to promote its technology in a wide range of vehicles instead of the limited number that currently offer similar features.

This isn’t anything unusual either. High-end safety features generally graduates from the top tier into less expensive vehicles as they age. Blind spot detection, self parking, alerts about objects around cars and many others have taken a similar path. Blind spot detection is an example of one that is also available as an aftermarket purchase.

By making drowsiness detection available without adding new sensors to a car, Bosch might well encourage automakers with cheaper cars to adopt it in the near future, though that remains to be seen.

  • http://www.brooklynmoving.info/ Tyron Yarbrough

    The car’s electric power steering system or stability control system is
    fed through the CAN bus system, found on all cars built in 1996 and
    later.

  • http://www.paliinstitute.com/ Sheena Whitt

    Power steering system or stability control system is fed through the CAN bus system, found on all cars built in 1996 and later.