Home / Auto News / News article: Scion Pickup Truck Rumored to be Based on Toyota RAV4 - AutoGuide.com News
 |  Apr 03 2012, 9:02 AM

When last we spoke to Scion boss Jack Hollis, his interest in a small truck for the youth brand was undeniable. Now reports of increased production at the automaker’s RAV4 facility in Woodstock, Ontario have spawned new rumors about the as yet unconfirmed sixth model in the Scion lineup.

Increased production of the RAV4 (up by 25%) could simply be a method Toyota is using to keep costs down by reducing the number of RAV4 models it imports from overseas. However, it also supports the possibility that Toyota will build a Scion truck based on the compact crossover platform.

Currently compact pickups are a dying breed, with CAFE rules penalizing smaller trucks that still aren’t tiny. Toyota has bucked this trend with the Tacoma, due mostly to the compact pickup’s dominance in the segment and Toyota’s continued efforts to be a player in the truck segment.

A unibody “truck” that is designed more as a lifestyle vehicle and less as a work machine would continue to help out Toyota’s fuel economy, and could also be rebaged as a Toyota model and sold overseas.

With Toyota currently offering both a 4-cylinder and a V6 in the RAV4, this might also make way for Scion’s first-ever six-cylinder model.

[Source: TacomaHQ]

  • emilio

    Great… I forsee slammed trucks in the future…

    How about you bring back the hilux?

  • Fat Man Chew

    Did they just use an aborted Chevy Avalanche shell?

  • DrLou

    This concept makes alot of sense for those of us who only need a truck for light hauling and as an everyday driver. I’m hoping Scion decides to provide AWD/ RWD, hybrid, and diesel options. This Dec 19, 2011 article suggests the upcoming Scion pickup may be introduced with a direct injection 4-cyclinder engine, which would be great too. ref. http://www.tacomahq.com/1253/2014-tacoma-direct-injection/

  • cyberpine

    Jeeze…. They’ve been flirting and teasing us with this thing forever. I wish one of the big three would just beat them to the punch and steal the huge smaller trucklet market that’s been building up in the States.

    IMO, All we really need is a variation on the Challenger, Camaro or Mustang.

    - Raise the roof line and tail like the Cadi CTS Coupe.
    - Give it a drop down tailgate and roll down or up rear window.
    - A hard plastic cargo area with deep under bed storage.
    - A wide entry that accomodates 4×8 sheet of plywoods with tailgate down and allows you to drive around with the back wide open “like” a truck
    - Push and recline the rear seats way back and way down for crazy head and leg room back there. Also give them super recline feature.

    There it is..

    Google Search “open cargo coupe” and “mila coupic” for prototypes.

  • avanti3258

    I am retired and need something practical for hauling (plants, mulch etc) that has a sports look. This would do the job. BUILD IT and we will buy it!

  • chary_lippolt@yahoo.com

    I will be first in line to buy that scion pickup, I drive a scion xa. & love it, I am retired and looking forward to the scion truck

  • srfsk8snw

    I’ll pass… I want a small truck to haul stuff not people. I don’t need or want rear seats.  the storage behind the regular cab tundra is about what I need inside. Going by the pic above the bed would not fit a surfboard, snowboard, bike, furniture, lumber etc… and I sure could not sleep in the back of it on a camping trip. The bed above is almost useless much like the discontinued Subaru Baja which I would have bought if it had a real bed. If this is anywhere near $20G I would rather get a basic Nissan Frontier. 

  • Singingtoast

    I have a Tacoma but I will trade it in for an ABAT.

  • Colum Wood

    Don’t count on it any more. http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2012/12/crossovers-not-cool-says-scion-boss.html
    “With a crossover not in Scion’s immediate future, neither is a long-rumored compact pickup says Murtha, telling AutoGuide that any discussions of such a vehicle by his predecessor Jack Hollis were more about personal preference than actual brand direction.”