Home / Auto News / News article: Ford Sees Big Future in Affordable Small Cars - AutoGuide.com News
 |  Jan 15 2014, 11:32 AM

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Ford believes that the future of the global automotive marketplace will include smaller and less expensive vehicles.

Speaking at a roundtable interview during the 2014 Detroit Auto Show, Ford CEO Alan Mulally said he believes compact cars like the Fiesta will make up a larger share of the global auto industry, including the U.S. As vehicles  become more expensive , the automaker expects to see a shift toward smaller vehicles in the U.S. that are also cheaper.

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Ford cited data that by 2025, the number of urban cities with more than 10-million people, will increase from 23 to 27. Mulally stressed in the interview that the industry as a whole needs to find ways to lower price points in order to make vehicles more affordable.

GALLERY: 2014 Ford Fiesta

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[Source: Detroit News]

Discuss this story at our Ford forum.

  • Red Ride

    Seems like an about face as just a few years back they said there was no future in small cars and large SUV’s were it.

  • Alfie

    That’s just because there was money to be made in big trucks. Now… not so much.

  • The Terminator

    Ford should concentrate on putting some Quality / Reliability back into their vehicles Small or Big as just about every one of their cars is at the bottom in the category ! While many people who test drive a Ford like the drivability / interior / exterior the Quality issues might not show until months later.

  • Somnambulator

    It’s hard to make vehicles more affordable when the autoworkers’ union forces you to pay uncompetitive wages, bennies, and pension, and when state and federal governments keep increasing rudimentary fuel, safety, and other regulations.