Nissan Sport Sedan Concept Video, First Look

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Nissan Sport Sedan Concept Video, First Look
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Nissan is tipping its hat to the future at this year’s Detroit automotive soiree. The Japanese brand unveiled a design study that hints what a next-generation Maxim might look like. Officially this orange four-door is called the Sport Sedan Concept.

And it’s all about design, because it sure as hell ain’t that sporty; I’ll tell you why shortly. In the looks department this car has a so-called V-Motion front end, a unique floating roof effect and familiar boomerang-shaped tail lamps that we’ve seen on other Nissans. Aside from this car’s face I really like what’s going on with the rest of its body.

Additionally this thing’s got a lower hood line and reduced ground clearance compared to regular sedans, ostensibly to make it look cool. Like every design study the Sport Sedan Concept rides on custom wheels. They span 21 inches and feature an eye-catching fan-like pattern.

SEE ALSO: 2014 Detroit Auto Show Coverage

The company said these design traits will likely be adapted to all future Nissan products.

Now inside, the cabin is dressed up with quilted seats, just like grandma used to stitch on Sundays after the church potluck… just kidding, it’s not that kind of quilt, but there is an attractive diamond pattern that runs across the bucket. Additionally this motif is carried through elsewhere in the interior, adding a three-dimensional feel to things

Now for the disappointing news. The Sport Sedan Concept is powered by a 300-plus horsepower 3.5-liter V6, which is admittedly pretty appealing. But completely contradicting the word “sport,” which is literally found in the middle of its name, the engine is matched to one of Nissan’s Xtronic CVTs.

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GALLERY: Nissan Sport Sedan Concept

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GALLERY: Nissan Sport Sedan Concept

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Discuss this story at our Nissan forum.

  • Shiratori1

    Yeah, you can stop with the CVT bashing now (that well is running pretty dry).

  • http://dbcooper.livejournal.com P.F. Bruns

    Agreed. Besides, look how far they’ve come in just the past few years.

  • MadOx75

    Seriously, CVTs are what Nissan does, so the complaining is getting old. The feel of them takes some getting used to, but they definitely know how to motivate whatever HP they are given. So long as it has paddle shifters so I can control the shifts if I like, I’m definitely considering this as my next car.

  • ABN

    You can say that, but the brand new Sentra we purchased has less than 20,000 miles and the transmission whines like a hyena.

  • That Feel

    It’s common knowledge across enthusiast forums that the CVTs used in the 6 cylinder variants of cars like the Altima and Maxima are of much higher quality and of completely different build than the ones in the lower end models like the Sentra, Altima 2.5, and Versa.

  • Shiratori1

    Pretty much. In fact, Reviewers for Motortrend couldn’t say enough good things about Subaru’s CVT during the SUV of the Year decision making process.

  • Lem Rogers

    Agreed. I’d take the Altima 3.5’s CVT over a 6-speed automatic any day of the week! I own an Altima 3.5SL and in Sport mode, you’d think you were driving a very smooth 7-speed automatic with the simulated shift points and the engine revving. There’s no engine bog like in the Sentra and Altima 2.5.

  • Lem Rogers

    When you said it’s not sporty I thought you were going to say it’s FWD. I think that’s a bigger deal than the CVT. RWD or better yet AWD would really make it an awesome Sport Sedan (think Q50).

  • ABN

    It still does little to bolster the reputation of Nissan in my book. If they are going to sell a product, it shouldn’t have drive train issues in less than 20,000 miles. It’s a Nissan for crying out loud, not a Kia. Also, this issue has been documented across enthusiast forums for years and it is still prevalent.

  • Lem Rogers

    ABN, I agree with you and understand your perspective. If my car had issues, I would not be happy with the manufacturer. Is the Sentra your first Nissan? Fortunately, I’ve owned/leased 3 Altimas in the past 7 years (all CVT) and haven’t had a single drivetrain issue.

    I don’t necessarily agree with your argument that if they can’t get the small things right that you shouldn’t trust them with a more expensive purchase. I believe you get what you pay for. Automakers have to cut a lot of corners to make an affordable vehicle and unfortunately, sometimes that means cutting quality. I don’t agree with it, but it’s true. My $30,000 Altima is a higher quality product than your $20,000 Sentra. I’m not saying that to brag, but that’s just the reality. I don’t usually look at cars as an investment because they depreciate in value. It’s an expense and a liability. But if you spend more, you’re more likely to get something of higher quality and that you’ll enjoy more.

  • ABN

    We previously had a 2007 3.5SL and replaced that with a 2012 Armada. The Altima was good and before that was a manual Sentra which was also fine. I understand that it’s a liability, that’s why I emphasized the word with quotation marks. We got an excellent deal on the Sentra and it was far less than $20,000. The deal and another redeeming quality, a 100,000 mile warranty are things I really can’t fuss about. It just makes me question whether it’s actually worth having the new transmission put in and it probably going bad again or just getting rid of the thing. For me, CVT transmissions have been 50% good. As a long time customer of Nissan I just expected better.

  • http://dbcooper.livejournal.com P.F. Bruns

    Obviously, I’m not going to argue with your specific experience–and I’m certainly not pleased that you aren’t happy with yours. However, CVTs in general tend to have improved radically over the years, and will likely only continue to improve as more innovations are made.

  • http://dbcooper.livejournal.com P.F. Bruns

    I see your point, but I would also strongly state that no matter how much one spends on a car, it should work. While I think CVTs are improving, I also would definitely have a problem with a car whose transmission begins making nasty loud noises at 20,000 miles.

  • Alfie

    I thought they made terrible sounds from zero miles….

  • Medan Photo

    this car not sport category, just a FUTURE car