Crashes Kill Teens More Often Than Anything Else

Crashes Kill Teens More Often Than Anything Else

Automobile crashes kill more teenagers than anything else according to a new study.

Roughly 2,500 teens die every year in automobile accidents, which makes it the leading cause of death in that age group according to a new study by Safe Kids Worldwide. The two next most common causes of death are homicide and suicide.

The results of the new study – funded by a $2 million grant from General Motors – were released this month showing that deaths are split almost evenly between passengers and drivers.

The study surveyed 1,051 teens between the ages of 13 and 19 to examine how children in that age group behave. Half of teens killed in a crash aren’t wearing their seat belt and 25 percent in the survey said they don’t always buckle up.

In 2010, 2,474 teens died in motor vehicle crashes and while that makes it the leading cause of death, it also marks a significant decrease from its peak at 5,491 in 2002.