Pickup Truck Owners Least Likely to Buckle Up

Pickup Truck Owners Least Likely to Buckle Up

The latest results in a U.S. government survey show that pickup truck owners are less likely to buckle up than people driving other types of vehicles.

The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) released the results of its 2014 National Occupant Protection Use Survey (NOPUS) this month. According to the survey, which relies on data recorded by trained observers watching drivers, 89 percent of people driving vans and utility vehicles wear seat belts, while 88 percent of people in cars buckle up. Meanwhile, 77 percent of pickup truck drivers strap in.

In order to gather those results, the survey sends trained observers to randomly selected roads and asks them to record data on which drivers are using their seat belt. As was the case with last year’s survey, the data comes from observers at 1,700 different sites across the country. The percentage of van, SUV and truck drivers that wear seat belts dipped by roughly one percent, but the marginal change isn’t enough to cause a drop in the overall proportion of seat belt use. In 2013, the survey showed 87 percent of drivers buckling up and that number stayed the same in 2014.