8 Car Features That Will Soon Be Obsolete

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8 Car Features That Will Soon Be Obsolete

A lot has changed over the past few years and the next car you buy may be missing a few features you’re used to.

Tech moves very quickly these days and automakers are responding. Here are some features we’re slowly seeing disappear in modern vehicles. Anything you’d miss?


CD Players

2015-Chevrolet-Trax-vs-2015-Nissan-Juke-31

We used to have cars that could carry multiple CDs, but now cars are starting to hit customers without even a single tray. Thanks to Bluetooth, USB connectivity and auxiliary ports making it easier to play music from smartphones, automakers are ditching CD players. When was the last time you bought a CD any way? 


Hand Brakes

Electric Parking Brake

That big chunky lever next to your shifter is also starting to disappear. More automakers are switching to an electric parking/emergency brake button or a foot-operated one. Although the function of a hand brake isn’t going anywhere, that tactile and satisfying feeling of yanking it is something that will certainly be missed.


Mirrors

2016-Cadillac-CT6-Rear-View-Mirror-01

Mirrors have been a safety feature in cars for a long time, with little modifications to help them be safer. We can now have edges of mirrors show more details with a convex pattern or a light tell us if there’s a car in our blind spot, but thanks to cameras, mirrors may be a thing of the past. Cadillac is changing your rear-view mirror into a camera-display system that provides a wider field of vision than the normal mirror, while Honda has been including a camera in the passenger side mirror that provides a better view of what’s happening in your car’s blind spot.


Physical Gauges

Audi-MMI-All-In-Touch-03

Will your next car have a traditional gauge cluster? Probably not, since so much information can be shown more effectively using a digital dashboard. More and more cars are including information-dense screens in front of the driver, which are so much more useful and versatile than a traditional gauge. They can change units easily, provide more information, and are typically customizable. Some cars, like those from Audi, have included large, dynamic maps on the screen in front of the driver, making navigation a breeze.

ALSO SEE: A Look at Audi’s Beautiful and Functional Digital Dashboard


True AWD

buick-lacrosse-technical-gallery

Speaking of Audi, when the brand announced it was changing the way its all-wheel drive system works, it signalled another loss of a true, permanent four-wheel drive system. Many other automakers have a “slip and grip” system, which sends power to only one axle (usually the front wheels) until additional grip is needed. This is due to the stringent fuel economy requirements set out by the EPA that ensures cars are more fuel efficient. By limiting how much power goes to wheels that don’t need it, cars are consume less fuel.


Keys

Volvo Cars digital key

Keys have changed quite a bit in the past few years. Most new cars these days don’t require drivers to physically put a key into the ignition to start the car or use one to even open the door. Proximity key fobs, which also allow you to unlock and lock you car by touching the handle of the vehicle, are far more practical than taking a key out of your pocket or bag. But now cars are starting to have smartphone support for such features, and automakers like Volvo are seriously considering replacing keys altogether with smart devices.


Gear Sticks

2015-Acura-RLX-vs-Infiniti-Q70L-16

While manual stick shifts are slowly being killed off, traditional gear selectors are going away too – they are increasingly being replaced by buttons or steering wheel columns to free up space on the center console.


ALSO SEE: 9 Clever Futuristic Technologies That Will Soon Be in Every Car

Physical Buttons/Knobs

2016 Honda Civic Display Screen 02

Thanks to the large touchscreen infotainment systems included in newer cars, automakers have started removing knobs and buttons related to media or HVAC controls. In many cases, this has been a pretty significant loss – sliding your finger to adjust the volume just doesn’t feel as tactile or precise as using a knob. Cadillac’s CUE uses a fully touch-sensitive system, while gesture controls are also being rolled out in higher-end BMWs. 

  • craigcole

    Other than the CD player’s demise, am I the only one that thinks most of these “improvements” are a step in the wrong direction?

  • earl

    totally agree…give me classic gauges and button and dials. Keep your touchscreen and all the electronic wizardry, except for maybe the camera mirror. Keep your stop/start systems…I guess I have to rebuild a last generation car.

  • You’re not the only one. I don’t want physical buttons to go away because I don’t have to look at them. I know them by feel and location. And keys? Keys are way more reliable than electronics. I have a co-worker with a Lexus who has had to call the local dealer three times due to electronics failures. My cheap-ass little Scion xB has a plain old key in case my keyless entry fob goes out. Same with mirrors. I don’t mind a separate rear view screen, but mirrors don’t shut down when a capacitor blows.

    I don’t have a problem with CD players, physical gearshifts (most cars have at least some electronic components in the gear linkage anyway), or even physical gauge packages (same deal) going away, but the other stuff isn’t smart to replace just yet.

  • Azar Attura

    Wish I had never sold my Elva Courier. Buttons galore, knobs, dashpots, gear shifter, Hand brake, crashbox, huge heater…..but…ulp, no cigarette lighter!!

  • Red Raspberry

    Loose you smart key fob and be ready to pay $300 for a new one programmed at the dealer.

  • Bucket

    So we are unhappy that drivers look down at the touch screen on their cell phones to text while driving, but by some twist of logic, it is okay to look down to a touch screen to do something simple like turn on the defroster? And since it is touch screen, unlike a knob or a button, the driver can no longer do this via touch but now need to take his eyes off the road to see where his finger is touching.

  • Danny Tse

    I wouldn’t buy a car if it doesn’t have a CD player. And, yes, I do still buy CDs. In fact, hundreds of them each year. No downloads or streaming for me.

  • Skye

    Cool article

  • Richard Serkey

    Bucket, keep bringing your common-sensical judgments to matters automotive. It’s specious reasoning to suppose that scrutinizing a touch screen on the dash is safer than palpitating a smart phone to get the car to perform HVAC functions. I’ve found with my 2014 model that its design engineers were entranced by novelty more often than by functionality.

  • Richard Serkey

    Right, and not just with hi-luxe models, either. I still love my proximity fob, but the romance cooled a bit when I found out what a dealer-programmed spare fob would cost.

  • Jonny_Vancouver

    You cannot be a real person.

  • Danny Tse

    Just because you don’t buy CDs??

  • Jonny_Vancouver

    I like my knobs and buttons, gear stick, key, e-brake, physical gauges and mirrors. the only thing I wouldn’t miss is the CD player, but what would be fun is a cassette player for that tactile feel with all those wonderful clicks and winding noises. (half kidding about that last one.)

    When I drive, I like to feel connected to my car and I’m not talking about a manual transmission. Cars should remain first and foremost mechanical. They should have switches, knobs and levers. Electronics in a vehicle shouldn’t interfere with the operation of the vehicle, they should complement it like abs brakes, traction control etc. safety features and the radio.

    Driving should be engaging. it should demand your focus and attention at all times and if you have to ask why, you shouldn’t be driving. Too much electronics in vehicles leads to more distracted driving which leads to more accidents -I’m sure there are several clever charts and graphs out there that will verify my point.

  • Jonny_Vancouver

    Right?!

  • Jonny_Vancouver

    Agreed.

  • Jeffery Surratt

    It is not so much single CDs, but I do have about 80 CD albums. I also, have a large collection of MP3s discs with multiple albums on each disc and if my next car does not have a player it will be the first thing that I add. No I am not going to transfer 100 MP3 discs to something else just so I can play them in my car. I do not even own a cell phone, cancer risk will keep me from using one. I guess i can figure how to use my laptop computer to send music through the car system. What a pain!

  • Jeffery Surratt

    They want us to buy the new more fuel efficient cars, but with all the electronics that are going to give you problems, nothing newer than a 2010 model year may be a better choice. Then in 10 years, when that one dies the self driving Uber cars will be on the road and I can save money by not even owning a car. They are going to kill car ownership with the high price of ownership and trips to the repair shop for stuff that used to almost never break in 200,000 miles.

  • Mike

    Automakers are obsessed with out-gunning their competition by introducing features to the marketplace. Some are fantastic, like rearview cameras, and others not so much. Chrysler, BMW, Lincoln, now Cadillac, and others are experimenting with gearshifts (this is nothing new Edsel, Plymouth, even some Russian cars tried pushbuttons to name a few) in an effort to save space and weight. Buttons, knobs, sticks that return to center, all are being tried to varied success. Chrysler found themselves recalling their return to center shifter because people were getting out of their vehicles without putting them in park first. We can’t see into the future, so we must try out ideas that have merit. The beauty of a free marketplace is that if you don’t like something, you don’t have to buy! For me, I can’t think of a more perfect execution of tech and mechanical than the Dodge Charger R/T I have. Tech galore and driver involvement with buttons and knobs for everything you need often, a touchscreen for when you want to dig deeper – perfecto.

  • Bucket

    Not that I can afford one, but I decided to pop into a Tesla store the other day. Holy smoke, that screen is bigger than my laptop screen. They want me to look down and try to find some icon in this field of changing information to try to find the one area to tap to do something mundane? No wonder Tesla is investing in automated driving — to keep the guy from crashing his $100k car while trying to tune into the baseball game!

  • 8lackie

    Excellent! More things to break, I’m unable to fix.

  • Larry Odneal

    Shoot, my Dad’s 1960 DeSoto had a push-button transmission! The buttons were on the dash and always seemed too dangerous to me . . . if you accidentally pushed “R” while cruising down the interstate I’m pretty sure the tranny would fall out and you’d all be dead.

  • Jim Farnsworth

    Exactly! When I have my fingers on the heater/AC I don’t have to look and I know the changes I made by how much I rotated the knob.

  • pywaket_1

    As much as i will miss them, gauge clusters are going to end up as screens. They’re cheaper -think how cheap tablet computers are – and since billions of those get sold, the technology can be leveraged. Electromechanical speedometers, tachs, fuel gauges, etc. are more complicated and more expensive to build since they have moving parts. Plus, screens give the ability to easily change what displays you see and when. They can be infinitely configurable, and the car maker can give you different displays depending on what you want to see. Anyone else remember Saab’s “night panel” from the 80’s? Everything but the speedo was dark, to help with night vision, and when something needed attention (temperature, fuel, etc.) the panel would light up. Using screens takes that to the next level. Bear in mind, I’m not talking about the climate/radio controls, but the gauge cluster, where we already look away from the road for a moment to see how fast we’re going.

    They’ll end up being more reliable, since no moving parts and no bulbs to replace if an indicator light stops working. Fixable by the owner? Not really, but neither have the regular clusters that have been used for the past 30 years. Very few people fix their own speedometer now, anyway. You just swap in a replacement. It won’t be any more expensive than it is now, possibly cheaper, since they’re easier to manufacture. Go ahead, call the Toyota dealership and ask the price of a replacement display for a ’95 Camry. It will be many hundreds of dollars. An LCD display has the potential to be much less expensive.

    Still, I’ll miss those nice, physical gauges, just on a purely aesthetic basis, but LED panels will just be cheaper and more reliable. And you can have different displays based on how you’re driving. Normal everyday driving: big speedometer, smaller tach and other basic gauges. Driving for performance: big tachometer right in the center, where it belongs. You get the idea.

    As far as controls for the audio and climate control? Yeah, I don’t like the idea of those becoming a touchscreen item in the center console where you have to take your eyes off the road to adjust the temperature, or the fan speed, or radio volume. Keep buttons and knobs for that, since you can reach for them and adjust without taking your eyes off the road. However, displaying the current status (temp, fan speed, radio station, etc.) on a screen is fine. Again, you’ve always had to look away to see that information. Just make sure that the screen layouts are intuitive and you don’t need to scroll through menus go see basic information. But go ahead and hide the less accessed info. For example, I don’t need a knob to adjust the fader or balance control on the audio system since I rarely change that, once it’s set to my liking. I can do that when I’m stopped.

    What is “true AWD”? As long as the car can put power to the wheels that aren’t usually driven somehow, and it works well, I don’t really care how they do it. If manufacturers want to get away from using 3 differentials to get power to the rear wheels on an AWD car that normally runs in FWD or to the front wheels on one that normally is RWD, sure, use electric motors. Again, as long as you can drive all 4 wheels when you need it done, the way it’s done is unimportant. Again, mechanical or fluid diffs aren’t exactly uncomplicated. A big generator on the engine, used to create power to send to electric motors powering rear or front wheels is just as good as a setup of multiple differentials and driveshafts. Plus, with a few batteries, you can run in “electric only” mode for a few miles, should you get caught in traffic.

    Again, this isn’t a new idea. The very first AWD vehicle was the Lohner-Porsche, and it was built over a hundred years ago. It used 4 motors, one to drive each wheel, and an engine driven generator to provide power for those motors. This is also how diesel trains work. The diesel engine drives a generator, and then that power is sent to wheel motors. They do this to avoid needing mechanical transmissions – just think of how much you’d need to slip the clutch to get a train moving from a dead stop if it had a normal transmission!

    Mirrors? Well, cameras are getting really cheap, can have varying sensitivity depending on light conditions, and can be placed anywhere. You can still have a screen in each door and on the windshield so the “mirror” will be in the same place as far as the driver is concerned. It’ll just be a video screen being fed from a camera. And you can have lots of cameras – no more blind spots. Plus, it improves aerodynamics. Instead of a big hunk of glass and plastic hanging off each side of the vehicle (which adds lots of drag at highway speeds and can easily get broken off when you’re parked on a narrow street) , you’ll have much smaller cameras doing the job for you. You move the displays inside, but in the approximate same locations, so the user interface aspect is the same as it’s always been.

    So, yes, things will change, but I see these things as improvements, overall. People were worried when fuel injection started replacing carburetors, and computers replacing mechanical distributors with points that needed adjusting twice a year. But look at the benefits: Compare the power and performance (and reliability) of a pre-1985 sedan to a modern one, and see the difference. Ten to 15 second 0-60 times for “average” cars used to be the norm. Now, anything that takes over 10 seconds is considered very slow. On cold days, you used to have to warm your car up for a few minutes before it would run well. Now, it’s just start it up and drive off. Basic maintenance used to mean adjusting the points, distributor, carbs, gapping the plugs, etc. at least once, if not twice a year. Now, you get an oil change every 5-10K miles and you’re good to go. No “tune-up” needed. 100K miles on a car typically used to mean it was a worn-out heap – you didn’t buy one unless you were really in need of the cheapest car you could buy. Now, something like that is considered a decent used car, that will easily go another 100K, and that’s the case with almost all car makers. On a per-mile basis, maintenance and repairs are much cheaper now than they were in the good old days.

    So, on the whole, these things are good.

  • smartacus

    i say they should resurrect the high-beam kickdown button on the floor.
    but use it for radio SCAN/SEEK

  • Sebastian Rodriguez Camargo

    F. you . We won’t allow that, right?

  • TransWarpDrive

    I agree, Jeffery. I have a very large CD collection – over 400 discs, in fact. And while I’m not too crazy about automakers’ plans to do away with handbrakes, mirrors, and mechanical instruments, I DO NOT like the carmakers’ attitude – or the author’s – that no one buys CDs anymore, because we do. The problem with digitizing music, or electronicizing parking brakes, instrument panels, etc., is that if the circuitry that controls those features fails, then the car becomes undrivable until those items are fixed. And there’s something about having a CD, cassette tape, or vinyl record in your hands – it’s a tangible item, with the music stored on it and not on a tiny flash drive or somewhere in “the cloud” where it can easily be erased or wiped out of existence. You still have it at hand, and don’t have to plead through an electronic middleman to get it so you can play it.

  • You forgot to mention the Outlander PHEV and the Dual Motor Tesla vehicles, centuries after the Lohner-Porsche.

  • YOU ARE A BULLSHIT!

  • Danny Tse

    Oh really. Prove it!!

  • Joe Yoman

    Insanity. We the people need to put an end to this digital obsession and over complexity. A damn car is meant to get you from one place to another reliably. All this shiiit WILL break down and cost a fortune to repair after the warranty runs out and you will NOT be able to use your car or repair it yourself any longer. The new technological wonder Tesla sedan that CR so raves about left its Toyota loving staff stranded on the side of the road because the idiotic electronic door handles failed thus rendering this 120K plus wonder a giant paper weight! Think what the repair bill will be for that after the warranty is up. Who will even be able to fix it?

  • Joe Yoman

    And more distractions and money out of your pocket!

  • Joe Yoman

    Don’t worry. Those Millennials that these things are geared for can afford all these repairs when all this crap goes south right?

  • Joe Yoman

    Don’t worry. All these digital inspired automation will just keep driving prices up, insurance up, and used car ownership for lower income folks will be next to impossible in this dreadful future.

  • Joe Yoman

    All this garbage really makes me miss the 80’s and 90’s. Things were so much simpler and easier.

  • Jeffery Surratt

    I am retired and use the city bus for shopping and Doctor visits. I have a 1966 Mercedes that needs over $2,500 in repairs, so it will stay parked. I have not purchased gasoline since JULY 2014. I will purchase a used Volt sometimes late 2017 or early 2018. But it will be using electricity 80 to 90 percent of the time. I hope Uber like services come to my city soon. Then I will not even have to own a car. I us Greyhound to travel during the summer. $109 from Great Falls, MT to Dallas, TX, 49 hours, 3 transfers, you just cannot do it any cheaper.

  • pywaket_1

    You’ve obviously never looked at a carburettor from the 80s – 6 million vacuum hoses, dashpots, sensors, wires and other crap. Modern fuel injection systems are much more reliable, and simpler to maintain. With an OBDII code reader, it’s easier than ever to diagnose engine drivability problems.

  • pywaket_1

    So, how do you play a CD without an “electronic middleman”? Do you read the burned in pits with a microscope and translate them in your brain? No, you have a CD player: a complicated electromechanical device with servo motors, computers, lasers and all sorts of things that can break. Can *you*, personally fix one of those when it breaks? Solid state devices like flash drives are 100x more reliable.

    Tell you what. Put a CD in your pocket and carry it around for a week with your keys and whatever else is in there. Put a flash drive in there too. For good measure, take both out occasionally and drop them on the ground and accidentally kick them a few feet when you bend over to pick them up.

    Now, after doing that, see which one is still readable.

    I’m no youngster. I’ve been using computers since it was standard procedure to load programs from open-reel tapes, and paper tapes and punch cards were still in wide use. Technology is getting more and more reliable, and cheaper, everyday.

    CDs were a short term, stop-gap measure on the way to higher fidelity music – a big improvement over vinyl, no matter what hipsters tell you. I was an early adopter of them, as I enjoyed the improved sound quality and bought my first player in 1986. But if you’d given me the choice of a CD player or a modern solid-state music storage device back then, there’s no question I’d have chosen the latter.

  • pywaket_1

    As much as i will miss them, gauge clusters are going to end up as screens. They’re cheaper -think how cheap tablet computers are – and since billions of those get sold, the technology can be leveraged. Electromechanical speedometers, tachs, fuel gauges, etc. are more complicated and more expensive to build since they have moving parts. Plus, screens give the ability to easily change what displays you see and when. They can be infinitely configurable, and the car maker can give you different displays depending on what you want to see. Anyone else remember Saab’s “night panel” from the 80’s? Everything but the speedo was dark, to help with night vision, and when something needed attention (temperature, fuel, etc.) the panel would light up. Using screens takes that to the next level. Bear in mind, I’m not talking about the climate/radio controls, but the gauge cluster, where we already look away from the road for a moment to see how fast we’re going.

    They’ll end up being more reliable, since no moving parts and no bulbs to replace if an indicator light stops working. Fixable by the owner? Not really, but neither have the regular clusters that have been used for the past 30 years. Very few people fix their own speedometer now, anyway. You just swap in a replacement. It won’t be any more expensive than it is now, possibly cheaper, since they’re easier to manufacture. Go ahead, call the Toyota dealership and ask the price of a replacement display for a ’95 Camry. It will be many hundreds of dollars. An LCD display has the potential to be much less expensive.

    Still, I’ll miss those nice, physical gauges, just on a purely aesthetic basis, but LED panels will just be cheaper and more reliable. And you can have different displays based on how you’re driving. Normal everyday driving: big speedometer, smaller tach and other basic gauges. Driving for performance: big tachometer right in the center, where it belongs. You get the idea.

    As far as controls for the audio and climate control? Yeah, I don’t like the idea of those becoming a touchscreen item in the center console where you have to take your eyes off the road to adjust the temperature, or the fan speed, or radio volume. Keep buttons and knobs for that, since you can reach for them and adjust without taking your eyes off the road. However, displaying the current status (temp, fan speed, radio station, etc.) on a screen is fine. Again, you’ve always had to look away to see that information. Just make sure that the screen layouts are intuitive and you don’t need to scroll through menus go see basic information. But go ahead and hide the less accessed info. For example, I don’t need a knob to adjust the fader or balance control on the audio system since I rarely change that, once it’s set to my liking. I can do that when I’m stopped.

    What is “true AWD”? As long as the car can put power to the wheels that aren’t usually driven somehow, and it works well, I don’t really care how they do it. If manufacturers want to get away from using 3 differentials to get power to the rear wheels on an AWD car that normally runs in FWD or to the front wheels on one that normally is RWD, sure, use electric motors. Again, as long as you can drive all 4 wheels when you need it done, the way it’s done is unimportant. Again, mechanical or fluid diffs aren’t exactly uncomplicated. A big generator on the engine, used to create power to send to electric motors powering rear or front wheels is just as good as a setup of multiple differentials and driveshafts. Plus, with a few batteries, you can run in “electric only” mode for a few miles, should you get caught in traffic.

    Again, this isn’t a new idea. The very first AWD vehicle was the Lohner-Porsche, and it was built over a hundred years ago. It used 4 motors, one to drive each wheel, and an engine driven generator to provide power for those motors. This is also how diesel trains work. The diesel engine drives a generator, and then that power is sent to wheel motors. They do this to avoid needing mechanical transmissions – just think of how much you’d need to slip the clutch to get a train moving from a dead stop if it had a normal transmission!

    Mirrors? Well, cameras are getting really cheap, can have varying sensitivity depending on light conditions, and can be placed anywhere. You can still have a screen in each door and on the windshield so the “mirror” will be in the same place as far as the driver is concerned. It’ll just be a video screen being fed from a camera. And you can have lots of cameras – no more blind spots. Plus, it improves aerodynamics. Instead of a big hunk of glass and plastic hanging off each side of the vehicle (which adds lots of drag at highway speeds and can easily get broken off when you’re parked on a narrow street or a parking lot) , you’ll have much smaller cameras doing the job for you. You move the displays inside, but in the approximate same locations, so the user interface aspect is the same as it’s always been.

    So, yes, things will change, but I see these things as improvements, overall. People were worried when fuel injection started replacing carburetors, and computers replacing mechanical distributors with points that needed adjusting twice a year. But look at the benefits: Compare the power and performance (and reliability) of a pre-1985 sedan to a modern one, and see the difference. Ten to 15 second 0-60 times for “average” cars used to be the norm. Now, anything that takes over 10 seconds is considered very slow. On cold days, you used to have to warm your car up for a few minutes before it would run well. Now, it’s just start it up and drive off. Basic maintenance used to mean adjusting the points, distributor, carbs, gapping the plugs, etc. at least once, if not twice a year. Now, you get an oil change every 5-10K miles and you’re good to go. No “tune-up” needed. 100K miles on a car typically used to mean it was a worn-out heap – you didn’t buy one unless you were really in need of the cheapest car you could buy. Now, something like that is considered a decent used car, that will easily go another 100K, and that’s the case with almost all car makers. On a per-mile basis, maintenance and repairs are much cheaper now than they were in the good old days.

    So, on the whole, these things are good.

  • Joe Yoman

    Except that fuel injection was on most cars by the mid to late 80’s and all through the 90’s so good try. I’m talking about cars that weren’t full of 50 different electronic nannies driving you insane, interiors that had actual color, way better styling on many models, way more offerings available and room for 6 in a full size sedan and 8 in a wagon. And btw I have rebuilt dozens of Dualjet and Quadrajet carburetors from the 70’s and 80’s. Once you do a few there is nothing much too them and a simple vacuum diagram is easy enough to follow to put those lines where they need to go. Just try diagnosing an intermittent bad bus signal on a new car that is causing havoc with the body control module and just wait foe these electric cars to start aging with touch sensitive electronic door handles and bucket loads of other tech items that will confound the owner well past the warranty.

  • wcjeep

    Older cellphones did have problems with simple calls. When using an HD system the phone call is very close to landline quality. HD system is a phone call over the 4g LTE system. Verizon has an end date for releasing 3g phones. Very soon all calls will be routed over 4g. Existing 3g will become either 4g or next gen 5g.

  • wcjeep

    We use the factory CD holder to place our cellphone mount. All music is placed on a Nano USB memory stick. If lost or stolen I’m out $15.

  • Jeffery Surratt

    I talk with my sister every day, she has hands free in her car, on her drive home from work, she lives in the Dallas, TX area. 3 out of 5 days her call drops out, and she has to redial me. When it does not, the voice quality is not as clear as my VOIP service and she is 4g.

  • wcjeep

    Not all 4g phones have HD calling. With Verizon, HD calling is only in effect if both callers are on Verizon HD enabled devices. In your case, it is likely she is not HD while talking to a Land based VoIP in HD mode even if she has an HD enabled phone. She would likely benefit from a Weboost cell booster. Weboost (formerly Wilson Electronics) make some great tech.

  • TransWarpDrive

    OK, maybe I shouldn’t have used the “pleading through an electronic middleman” argument; in retrospect that was a dumb idea on my part. That argument only works for the debate on “real printed books vs. electronic readers,” but that’s not what we’re debating here. What I SHOULD have said was this: I prefer to collect my music on media such as vinyl albums, audiotape, or compact discs rather than just download them off the internet or storing them on the cloud. With vinyl, tapes, or CDs, you have something tangible you can hold in your hand and you know the music you bought is safe in your collection – they won’t be erased if your hard drive accidentally crashes, nor can they be wiped out if someone hacks into your storage space on the cloud. You’ll always have a physical copy of the music ready to play whenever you want, providing nothing happens to destroy your collection of recordings (i.e. fire, theft, floods, etc.), and provided your sound system still works OK and the power doesn’t go out.

  • Trackhacker

    Same here. I tried to convert all my Flac to MP3 and use a USB in the car, but I’ve ran into numerous issues such as mixed CDs having 2-3sec gaps between the transitions which completely kill the mix. Than some cars have title length limits which is stupid. & Finally, some cars, not all, but some actually ruin the sound quality by a lot when using a USB. ~ Now some may say, just use your cell phone. Well…my cell has like 16Gig of space. I have over 600Gig of music…so yeah….that won’t work for me.