Of Course the Mercedes-AMG Hypercar Won’t be Cheap to Maintain

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Of Course the Mercedes-AMG Hypercar Won’t be Cheap to Maintain

The Mercedes-AMG hypercar will require some very pricey maintenance, but we’re going to guess its owners don’t care.

Not much is known about the Mercedes-AMG hypercar, but the German automaker did share a few new details to Motor1 at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. Known as Project One, the upcoming hypercar is set to debut at the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show this September and before then, expect to hear plenty of rumors and speculation about how it will stack up against the Aston Martin Valkyrie.

Previously, Mercedes-AMG revealed Project One will be powered by a modified version of the team’s Formula 1 turbocharged 1.6-liter V6 engine. It will be capable of revving to 11,000 rpm while generating over 1,000 horsepower, but all that power doesn’t come from just the 1.6-liter engine. Two motor generators and a lithium-ion battery will be used, with one of the generators paired to the main driveshaft to help power the rear wheels. The other generator is integrated into the turbocharger to help spool up the turbo, while recapturing energy from exhaust gasses.

But unlike the Formula 1 race car, Project One will also use an electric motor or two to help power the front wheels.

SEE ALSO: Mercedes-AMG’s 1,000-HP Hypercar Debuts This September

But there’s a downside to the high-tech powertrain. Mercedes-AMG chairman Tobias Moers said the hypercar will need an extensive engine overhaul at just 31,000 miles (50,000 kilometers) – which is less than what most street cars’ warranties last for. But since it’s limited to just 300 units with an expected price tag around $2.5-million, its owners likely won’t care. The bigger question is whether any of them will even reach 31,000 miles on the odometer.

The hypercar is expected to weigh around 2,200 pounds and if it all becomes a reality, it could be one of the greatest machines ever created. But for now, we’ll have to wait another six months before the official details are released.

[Source: Motor1]

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  • smartacusⓊ

    wow! engine-out at only 31,000 miles?

    Thank God, they don’t roll back their odometers like Ferrari

  • craigcole

    Fascinating, but this sounds like a crock of BS. Why would any automaker opt for a 1.6-liter engine that spins to 11,000 RPM and has to be replaced at just 50,000 clicks. What’s the point? Add some displacement, reduce the redline and make it last exponentially longer.