More Details on GM’s Active Aero System Revealed

AutoGuide.com has discovered another patent application revealing even more details on the active aero system General Motors has been developing.

This particular patent application is for “selective control of vehicle aerodynamics,” which isn’t too different than previous applications. This one, however, details an adjustable flap that is configured to shift relative to the aerodynamic aid element, helping control movement of ambient airflow relative to the aerodynamic aid element. In addition, the system features a mechanism configured to vary the position of the adjustable flap, relative to the aerodynamic aid element, allowing it to control how much downforce is generated.

For it all to work, the system could take advantage of sensors that are configured to detect certain parameters. Those sensors would be paired with an electronic controller to regulate the mechanism based on the detected parameters. “The at least one sensor may include a first sensor configured to detect a road speed of the vehicle as a first vehicle dynamic parameter and communicate the detected road speed of the vehicle to the electronic controller,” reads the patent application. “Additionally, the at least one sensor may include a second sensor configured to detect a rate of the yaw of the vehicle body as a second vehicle dynamic parameter and communicate the detected yaw rate to the electronic controller.”

SEE ALSO: GM Working on More Hardcore Active Aero Technology

Essentially, the adjustable flap would be used so the vehicle can maintain contact with the road surface at the front and/or rear ends at elevated road speeds by countering aerodynamic lift of the vehicle body, in response to the velocity of ambient airflow detected by the sensor. Naturally, the flap could also be used to aid stability and handling of the vehicle by varying a magnitude of the downforce on the vehicle body.

It’s still unclear which vehicle General Motors will use its active aero on, but a safe bet is the upcoming new Chevrolet Corvette. It should only be a matter of time before the American automaker announces details on the system, especially since many of these patent applications were originally filed in 2015.

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