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 |  Sep 23 2010, 4:44 PM


It’s cool to be environmentally friendly, and it’s even cooler to show everyone on the road how much you love Mother Earth. You can do it with the Puff illuminated pollution meter.

This interesting project was made by designer and artist Karolina Sobecka for the World Maker Faire in New York City. Created to raise motorist awareness of their carbon emissions, the Puff comes with two essential components. The first is a cartoon-like cloud that attaches to the vehicle’s exhaust pipe, while the second is an iPhone app that monitors the vehicle’s emissions. When you car produces lots of carbon, the cloud changes color. This alerts both the driver and everyone on the street as to how much pollution is being spewed into the atmosphere.

So how about it? Would you put a Puff on your car to show the world how much you’re polluting the air? Do you think it will actually cause people to think before taking their cars out or is it just a cute gimmick? Let us know your thoughts in the comments section below.

[Source: Makezine via Autoblog]

 |  Jun 07 2010, 11:46 AM

If you thought the 55mph limit was bad, brace yourself. A study by Dutch consulting firm CE Delft claims that reducing the speed limit to 50mph will cut carbon emissions by as much as 30%.

A reduction in the speed limit is a polarizing issue, with some people doubtlessly in favor of such a move, which would result in less fuel being burned and fewer cars on the road. However, CE Delft stressed that the 50 mph speed limit would be most effective in the Netherlands, as more people would walk, bike or take public transit – options that aren’t always available in the United States. The spread out, suburban lifestyle we have here is just not conducive to this kind of change.

[Source: Transport & Environment]