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 |  May 03 2011, 10:09 AM

Honda’s recent airbag recall in North America is a growing problem for the auto maker. The recall, which affect 2001 to 2003 model Honda and Acura vehicles, is related to a faulty airbag module that might have been replaced by a defected service part, when the original driver’s airbag was changed.

This latest recall notice means Honda has to service an additional 833,000 vehicle. That is on top of the 437,763 units Honda had recalled last year for the same issue.

The faulty part is the airbag inflator, which could fail in the event of a crash, resulting in potential serious injury to the driver.

Vehicles affected include some 2001 to 2002 Honda Accord and Civic, 2002 Odyssey, 2002 to 2003 CR-V and Acura 3.2 TL, and 2003 3.2 CL coupes.

So if your vehicle is affected, Honda will send out recall letters by the end of May.

 |  May 19 2010, 9:41 AM

Mercedes-Benz-E-Class_2006_800x600_wallpaper_04

Federal investigators are looking into faulty airbags on the 2005-06 Mercedes-Benz E-Class luxury sedan. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has said that it has received four complaints regarding a wiring harness in the steering column, that could lead to the aig bags failing to deploy in a front-impact crash. No injuries have been reported. Roughly 100,000 vehicles could be affected.

According to Robert Moran at Mercedes-Benz USA, the issue stems from a wring harness that could be too short. The problem may arise if a driver puts the telescopic wheel all the way out. Moran says that if this happens to a vehicle, it would signal a warning light telling the owner to bring the vehicle in for service.

Following a spate of recalls by Toyota, NHTSA itself has also been under close scrutiny and so has been stepping up its number of recall investigations.

[Source: Bloomberg]