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 |  Apr 30 2013, 8:02 PM

2005-ford-crown-victoria-police-interceptor

Last September, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration opened a probe into the Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor for a possible problem with the steering assembly.

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 |  Aug 03 2010, 11:27 AM

The Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor is one of the best used buys on the market. Virtually indestructible, and packing enough space for 5 adults and all their gear, the CVPI, as the car is known in internet-speak, is a spartan but durable alternative to the regular family sedan. With rear-wheel drive and a 4.6L V8, the car has some performance chops as well, but best of all is its price – examples can often be found for under $1,000, for a tired, ratty patrol car, to a few thousand dollars for a mildly used example with a few creature comforts.

One Salinas, California man, Fidel Aguilar, apparently ran afoul of law enforcement after his CVPI was pulled over for having illegally tinted windows. Officers then noticed the front brush bars and “Police Interceptor” badges on his car and decided that he was impersonating a police officer. There are literally hundreds of thousands of cars identical to this on the road, and Aguilar likely would have gotten off the charge if he didn’t admit that he was a janitor who wanted to be a police officer, and decided to deck out his car to look like an undercover police vehicle. Aguilar also apparently added a siren to the car, something that crosses the line in most people’s books.

Police were understandably concerned about Aguilar pulling people over and committing crimes in a white CVPI, and no doubt Aguilar was a bit of a nutjob. We can’t help but wonder whether CVPIs will be targeted by law enforcement in the future, which is especially ironic since most of them are obtained via police auction.

[Source: KSBW]