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 |  Jun 09 2011, 1:32 PM


This is the sort of thing you won’t see at community dinner theater—Hungarian artist Hajnal Németh turned a mangled BMW 525i into the focus of an experimental opera that reflects the life cycle of a car accident.

Entitled “Crash: Passive Interview,” the opera features a liberetto performed by singers inside BMW’ Leipzig plant in Germany, with lyrics that are similar to the interviews given to police after an accident. The factory represents the birthplace of the car, and the wrecked BMW E39 inside the factory is the completion of the car’s life cycle. Németh’s piece, according to the installation’s literature, depict “a life cycle of a car that had sacrificed itself to save its driver.”

Németh also filmed the assembly line with BMW’s permission, as well as presenting spoken testimony from accident survivors. Despite BMW’s involvement, they did not finance any aspect of the work. However, they did label the 5-Series as “a crashed BMW as a tragic hero.” Nice try, Aeschylus.

As an art piece it is highbrow, yet emminently understandable—most of us have been involved in an accident, and felt some loss with a totaled car. And as far as wrecking cars goes, it’s a damn sight better than Jonathan Schipper’s heart-wrenching Firebird accident.

If you can swing an Italian getaway, Crash will be featured in Venice at the biannual Biennale di Venezia exhibition until November 27th.

[Source: New York Times]