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 |  Feb 29 2012, 7:01 PM

Every year in Spain, the biggest members of the telecommunications industry get together to show off the latest in technology. This year, Ford Motor Company executive chairman, Bill Ford spoke about his vision of mobile technology and how it fits in with Ford’s plans.

Ford mainly discussed an infrastructure of connected cars to help reduce traffic and gridlock. He said the number of cars on the road will likely quadruple by 2050 to reach 4 billion. He’s been working hard at trying to resolve the congestion issues that would arise with such an increase.

One of his ideas involves connecting cars, transport officials and mobile devices to create a global transportation solution.

“Now is the time for us all to be looking at vehicles on the road the same way we look at smartphones, laptops and tablets; as pieces of a much bigger, richer network.”

Ford’s plan, called “BluePrint for Mobility,” has ambitious short and long term goals.

The company aims to develop an intuitive in-car mobile platform that can warn drivers of traffic jams and accidents. There are also plans in plance to build on current technology like autonomous parking. Think of Ford’s latest technologies, like Active Park Assist and Adaptive Cruise Control, but enhanced to the next level.

Some more radical ideas from Ford include reserving parking spots for destinations before you leave the house, just imagine Christmas Eve without the murderous suburban mothers in mall parking lots.

“Cars are becoming mobile communications platforms and as such, they are a great untapped opportunity for the telecommunications industry. Right now, there are a billion computing devices in the form of individual vehicles out on our roads,” Ford said.