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The AutoGuide News Blog is your source for breaking stories from the auto industry. Delivering news immediately, the AutoGuide Blog is constantly updated with the latest information, photos and video from manufacturers, auto shows, the aftermarket and professional racing.
 |  Mar 05 2014, 8:00 AM

2015 ford f-450 super duty

Chrysler’s Ram truck brand raised the bar considerably when it announced a new heavy duty pickup capable of towing 30,000 lbs with a monstrous 850 lb-ft of torque. Now it’s Ford’s turn to push the limits of what a pickup can do.

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 |  Mar 25 2013, 8:31 AM

Cowboy Up


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Once upon a time trucks were built for work. They had manual door locks, crank windows and AM radios, if they had any sound system at all. Leather seats, air conditioning and voice-activated distractions were out of the question. Like a framing hammer, pickups were simple and effective.

For decades they were purpose-made for hard-working men (and women), the kind of folks that make Paul Bunyan look like a dragqueen. But somewhere along the line these roughneck vehicles became cool with the subdivision set. People living in suburbia started to buy them en masse. With sales increasing so did the clarion call for more comfort.

Today it’s easy to push a simple truck’s window sticker well into luxury-car territory… and beyond. Sure, these vehicles can still handle a 14-hour day on the jobsite and are even more capable than their forebears, but more often than not they’re loaded with costly options that appeal to style-conscious shoppers rather than blue-collar workers. Here’s a list of 10 pricey pickups tailor-made for urban cowboys. The MSRPs are listed without incentives, so actual pricing may vary.

VIDEO: Ford Releases Seven High Quality Videos About the 2011 Super Duty

Mike Rowe of Dirty Jobs hosts an in-depth look at the industry's number one selling truck

 |  Oct 01 2009, 3:20 PM

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Ford has just released seven new high quality videos about the new 2011 F-Series Super Duty (and its all-new 6.7-liter Power Stroke V8) that debuted last week at the Texas State Fair. Hosted by Mike Rowe from Dirty Jobs, the short programs examine the the new truck, its powertrain and incredible capability.

If you like trucks, diesels or just great engineering, these spots are all worth a look. They take you through the basics of the (complex) new diesel engine, as well as innovative features like Live Drive PTO (Power Take Off), which allows auxiliary equipment like snowplows or salt spreaders to be powered through the transmission.

The only thing Ford hasn’t told us about the all-new 2011 Super Duty is exactly how much power the new Power Stroke 6.7-liter V8 motor makes.

GALLERY: 2011 Ford F-Series Super Duty

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See after the jump for six more videos:

[Source: m80im]

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Report: 2011 Ford Super Duty Will Debut at Texas State Fair

New model to get completely redesigned 6.7-liter Power Stroke V8

 |  Sep 10 2009, 10:45 AM

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After releasing some exciting technical info on an all-new Power Stroke engine for the 2011 F-Series Super Duty, Ford has now announced plans to officially unveil the new diesel pickup at the Texas State Fair, with sales starting in the Spring of next year.

Under the hood of the new F-Series Super Duty will be a revolutionary new 6.7-liter Power Stroke turbo-diesel engine. The all-new engine promises a, “significant improvement in torque, horsepower and fuel economy,” says Ford in a press release, stating that this new F-Series Super Duty would continue to be a class leader in both payload and towing. It will also be significantly quieter than past diesels.

Numerous high-tech innovations have been employed in building this new engine, starting with a compacted graphite iron (CGI) engine block that Ford says is twice as strong as standard iron blocks. This was deemed necessary due to the increases in power output.

The new engine makes use of a Honeywell single variable turbine turbo (similar to the one found on the Porsche 911 Turbo), but takes turbo technology a step further still. Instead of one, there are two compressor wheels driven off a single turbine impeller, working like a bi-turbo setup that gives the engine a fast response time with little lag as well as the power of a larger turbo.

Visually, the new engine looks remarkably different, due to the fact that the intake and exhaust systems are the reverse of a conventional engine. The exhaust manifolds sit in the valley of the big V8 engine, while the intake manifold is on the outside. This means the cylinder heads are essentially flipped around.

By significantly reducing the amount of exhaust piping, lag is reduced considerably. Additionally, this new packaging moves the hotter elements of the engine (like the turbocharger and exhaust pipes) away from the intake areas, ensuring a constant supply of cool air to the engine. And as for that turbo, it sits in the valley between the cylinder banks. Due to its location, spool up is considerably faster and the engine’s overall balance is improved. Another major benefit of this setup is that that cab no longer has to be removed from the frame if work needs to be done on the turbo. The fuel-pump, EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) components and the thermostats are also easily accessible from the front of the vehicle.

Ford still hasn’t released any info on how much power the new Super Duty makes, but we’ll be sure to report on it as soon as they do.

GALLERY: 2011 Ford Power Stroke 6.7-Liter V8

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[Source: Autoblog]

Report: 2011 Ford Super Duty to Get New 6.7-Liter Power Stroke V8

New engine has reversed cylinder heads and a sequential variable turbine geometry turbo

 |  Aug 31 2009, 11:22 AM

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Ford is set to release a revolutionary new 6.7-liter Power Stroke turbo-diesel engine for its line of Super Duty F-Series trucks in 2011. The all-new engine promises a, “significant improvement in torque, horsepower and fuel economy,” says Ford in a press release, stating that this new F-Series Super Duty would continue to be a class leader in both payload and towing.

Numerous high-tech innovations have been employed in building this new engine, starting with a compacted graphite iron (CGI) engine block that Ford says is twice as strong as standard iron blocks. This was deemed necessary due to the increases in power output.

The new engine makes use of a Honeywell single variable turbine turbo (similar to the one found on the Porsche 911 Turbo), but takes turbo technology a step further still. Instead of one, there are two compressor wheels driven off a single turbine impeller, working like a bi-turbo setup that gives the engine a fast response time with little lag as well as the power of a larger turbo.

Visually, the new engine looks remarkably different, due to the fact that the intake and exhaust systems are the reverse of a conventional engine. The exhaust manifolds sit in the valley of the big V8 engine, while the intake manifold is on the outside. This means the cylinder heads are essentially flipped around.

By significantly reducing the amount of exhaust piping, lag is reduced considerably. Additionally, this new packaging moves the hotter elements of the engine (like the turbocharger and exhaust pipes) away from the intake areas, ensuring a constant supply of cool air to the engine. And as for that turbo, it sits in the valley between the cylinder banks. Due to its location, spool up is considerably faster and the engine’s overall balance is improved. Another major benefit of this setup is that that cab no longer has to be removed from the frame if work needs to be done on the turbo. The fuel-pump, EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) components and the thermostats are also easily accessible from the front of the vehicle.

Ford hasn’t released any specifics on the new engine but if out scientific and sophisticated brains have understood all this talk of a sequential variable turbine geometry turbo correctly, our power-loving neanderthal brains are in for a real treat when this new package makes it to market.

GALLERY: 2011 Ford Super Duty Power Stroke 6.7-Liter V8

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Official release after the jump:

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Ford’s Twin-Fuel ‘Bobcat’ Engine Could Replace Power Stroke Diesels

New engine could help Ford achieve mandated 30 mpg truck fleet average

 |  Jun 10 2009, 12:23 PM

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At a recent engineering conference Ford representatives gave a presentation on secret new engine the company is developing. Code named “Bobcat” the new twin-turbo 5.0-liter V8 engine is seen more as an alternative truck engine, although as it is similar to Ford’s EcoBoost engine, passenger car applications are possible.

The Bobcat engine is a twin-fuel engine, using both conventional gasoline and E85 ethanol. Both fuel systems even have their own tanks and fuel injectors. Here’s how it works:

Turbochargers work to compress the air, while conventional port-injection of gasoline is used to get fuel into the cylinders. Then ethanol is sent into the combustion chambers through direct-injection, eliminating knock by cooling the air/fuel mixture. Ethanol is only added under high-load conditions, otherwise the engine operates like a conventional gasoline engine. By injecting ethanol, it also raises the fuel octane rating from 87-91 to 150 – allowing for extremely high compression. As a result, an engine the size of the 5.0-liter one can make 500hp and 750 ft-lbs of torque, while getting 25 to 30 percent better fuel-economy than a conventional gasoline engine.

Ford developed the technology alongside Ethanol Boosting Systems of Cambridge, Mass., which calls its trademarked process DI Octane Boost. The Bobcat engine would be comparable to Ford’s 6.4-liter Power Stroke diesel, which makes 350hp and 650 ft-lbs of torque, but would cost one third the price to make as no exhaust treatment systems would be necessary.

The system is also 5 to 10 percent more fuel-efficient than Ford’s new EcoBoost engine.

The down-side is that as there are two fuel-tanks, both would need to be filled up separately. No worry says Ford, the 5.0-liter Bobcat V8 would get 528 miles on a 26-gallon tank, while a 10-gallon tank of E85 would last anywhere from 100 miles to 20,000 miles depending on how much heavy-load conditions the truck is driven under. And if no E85 is available, the engine can still run on just gasoline, albeit at reduced power.

The Bobcat engine may just be Ford’s answer to recent increase in the fleet fuel-economy rating for light trucks and SUVs, which will go from the current 23.1 mpg to 30 mpg by 2016.

[Source: PickupTrucks.com]