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 |  Jun 01 2010, 8:04 AM

Jaguar-R-D6-Concept-22-lg.jpg

With recent news of several new models joining a the Jaguar lineup, CEO Carl-Peter Forster has shed some new light on the company’s expansion plans – with a little creative interpretation from the folks at AutoExpress. According to a new report, the F-Type will take Jaguar down-market in the sports car segment, competing with the Porsche Boxster. Priced significantly lower than the current XK line, Jaguar could increase sports car sales considerably. The project is already part-way started with Forster admitting that designer Ian Callum has already begun the clay modeling stage.

Equally exciting is renewed ambition for Jaguar to create a new X-Type model – one that doesn’t devalue the brand, but rather works as a proper stepping stone to bring younger buyers into the Jaguar fold. Inspiration for the X-Type could come from the R-D6 concept (above), with coupe-like styling along the lines of the Mercedes CLS.

Also planned is a new wagon model, likely off the XF platform – but that’s not all. At a press conference last week Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) chairman Ralf Speth commented that the XF has been a sales success, but that more models are needed in that family. This might be a clear hint that Jaguar is planning an XF Coupe (and possibly even a convertible). The cars would clearly target the Mercedes E-Class Coupe, which has already attracted enough attention that Infiniti has decided to build a rival M Coupe.

All these new models are thanks to a major investment by parent company Tata Motors, which has decided to put £1 billion into JLR each year for the next five years. And JLR doesn’t seem to be squandering the opportunity, instead using the cash infusion to design, engineer and build more high-volume models that will allow the automaker to become self-sustaining.

[Source: AutoExpress]