Honda Planning Lighter Vehicles

Jason Siu
by Jason Siu

Honda is looking into developing new manufacturing processes in order to make their vehicles lighter and to help lower manufacturing costs. But first, Honda plans to spend tens of billions of yen to revamp their production lines in Japan and overseas to use these new methods of manufacturing.

Some of these new processes that Honda’s incorporating involve welding other panels to the frame – such as the ceiling and side panels – rather than using bolts and reinforcing materials. Ultimately Honda is looking at scaling back on materials, parts and processing steps to produce their vehicles, and the process began with their recently launched N Box mini vehicle.

One of their main goals is to help advance the time it takes to enter emerging markets and by making vehicles lighter and cheaper, it’ll help expedite that process. With the N Box, Honda was able to make the vehicle 10-percent lighter and lowered the manufacturing costs after modifying one of the two production lines at its Suzuka plant.

Honda’s more immediate vehicle plans, as part of its Earth Dreams Technology initiative include the addition of direct injection technology across its lineup, as well as the use of CVT transmissions.

[Source: Reuters]

Jason Siu
Jason Siu

Jason Siu began his career in automotive journalism in 2003 with Modified Magazine, a property previously held by VerticalScope. As the West Coast Editor, he played a pivotal role while also extending his expertise to Modified Luxury & Exotics and Modified Mustangs. Beyond his editorial work, Jason authored two notable Cartech books. His tenure at AutoGuide.com saw him immersed in the daily news cycle, yet his passion for hands-on evaluation led him to focus on testing and product reviews, offering well-rounded recommendations to AutoGuide readers. Currently, as the Content Director for VerticalScope, Jason spearheads the content strategy for an array of online publications, a role that has him at the helm of ensuring quality and consistency across the board.

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