Ford Focus Could Get Fusion Driver-Assist Tech

Stephen Elmer
by Stephen Elmer
2013 Ford Focus: Ford's best-selling Focus continues the tradition of class-leading dynamics, safety and outstanding value in either four-door sedan or five-door hatchback bodystyle. (06/27/12)

In the North American market, the midsize-sedan segment commands the most clout, and therefore recieves the best technology, although Ford may go against the stereotype and offer its suite of driver-assistance technology in the compact Focus.

When the 2013 Ford Fusion debuted, it showed off the best of what Ford has to offer in terms of technology. An optional driver-assistance package gets you features such as lane-keeping assist, rear camera, adaptive cruise control, active park assist, and blind spot indicator with cross-traffic alert. All of this is necessary to stay competitive in the North American midsize-sedan market.

In Europe however, the compact segment is dominant, so the European spec Focus already gets all the perks of the driver assistance package. Sticking them in North American cars would be easy according to Ford, but so far the market has not called for it, mainly due to price-point. A compact car decked out with technology would cost more than most are willing to pay for a small car here in the U.S., but Ford is monitoring consumer choices when it comes to the tech in the Fusion, and will decide based on sales numbers.

[Source: Car and Driver]

Stephen Elmer
Stephen Elmer

Stephen covers all of the day-to-day events of the industry as the News Editor at AutoGuide, along with being the AG truck expert. His truck knowledge comes from working long days on the woodlot with pickups and driving straight trucks professionally. When not at his desk, Steve can be found playing his bass or riding his snowmobile or Sea-Doo. Find Stephen on <A title="@Selmer07 on Twitter" href="http://www.twitter.com/selmer07">Twitter</A> and <A title="Stephen on Google+" href="http://plus.google.com/117833131531784822251?rel=author">Google+</A>

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