Toyota Moving Closer to Wireless Charging

Luke Vandezande
by Luke Vandezande

Toyota doesn’t see much of a market in purely electric cars, but that doesn’t mean the company isn’t looking at one of the most interesting technologies commonly associated with those products.

Wireless charging technology offers drivers the ability to recharge their vehicles without worrying about actually plugging them in. While the technology isn’t new, a new report suggests that Toyota has signed an agreement to license the intellectual property of a company specializing in those systems.

Toyota’s plug-in hybrid Prius could benefit from the system’s magnetic resonance to charge in close proximity. By fitting a vehicle with one of the magnetic resonance pads and a parking space with the other, drivers only need to park on top of the pad and walk away; energy transfer happens without a cable. Those pads measure 19.7 square inches and can either sit on top of the ground or be build into parking spaces.

The Japanese automotive giant’s plans for the system aren’t entirely clear, but Eric Giler, CEO of the company Toyota is licensing the system from, told Automotive News that he expects it to start appearing on vehicles from the 2016 model year.

[Source: Automotive News]

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Luke Vandezande
Luke Vandezande

Luke is an energetic automotive journalist who spends his time covering industry news and crawling the internet for the latest breaking story. When he isn't in the office, Luke can be found obsessively browsing used car listings, drinking scotch at his favorite bar and dreaming of what to drive next, though the list grows a lot faster than his bank account. He's always on <A title="@lukevandezande on Twitter" href="http://twitter.com/lukevandezande">Twitter</A> looking for a good car conversation. Find Luke on <A title="@lukevandezande on Twitter" href="http://twitter.com/lukevandezande">Twitter</A> and <A title="Luke on Google+" href="http://plus.google.com/112531385961538774338?rel=author">Google+</A>.

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