Run-Flat Tires Improve But They're Still Not Great: TireRack

Jason Siu
by Jason Siu

Is a mass-market run-flat tire good enough to find its way on your car?

TireRack.com recently published its results of a run-flat tire comparison and concluded that advancing tire technologies do make it easier for drivers of mainstream vehicles to consider run-flat tire replacement options. In the past, run-flat tires have been limited in availability, since vehicles needed special wheels and suspension in order to use run-flat tires. But now, Bridgestone has developed DriveGuard, which is the first full line of mass-market run-flat tires.

SEE ALSO: Should I Buy Tires Made in China?

While offering the convenience of being able to drive up to 50 miles at up to 50 mph without air, run-flat tires still have their downsides. There’s a modest penalty in ride quality and fuel economy, according to the report, but there’s always a price to pay for convenience.

“By understanding that most consumers find buying replacement tires a mundane, often confusing task, TireRack.com began testing the tires it sells nearly two decades ago, and our goal remains the same today, to empower consumers to make an educated tire buying decision,” said Matt Edmonds, vice president, TireRack.com.

Jason Siu
Jason Siu

Jason Siu began his career in automotive journalism in 2003 with Modified Magazine, a property previously held by VerticalScope. As the West Coast Editor, he played a pivotal role while also extending his expertise to Modified Luxury & Exotics and Modified Mustangs. Beyond his editorial work, Jason authored two notable Cartech books. His tenure at AutoGuide.com saw him immersed in the daily news cycle, yet his passion for hands-on evaluation led him to focus on testing and product reviews, offering well-rounded recommendations to AutoGuide readers. Currently, as the Content Director for VerticalScope, Jason spearheads the content strategy for an array of online publications, a role that has him at the helm of ensuring quality and consistency across the board.

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