Why Are 2024 Mustangs Catching Fire?

Michael Accardi
by Michael Accardi
An improperly secured clutch line can come into contact with exhaust components. Image: Kyle Patrick

Ford is recalling 2024 Mustangs due to an issue with improperly secured clutch pressure lines on vehicles equipped with manual transmissions.


The recall affects 8,161 vehicles, which may have a missing or improperly installed barrel nut that secures the line to the firewall stud. The clutch pressure line has the potential to move around and come into contact with hot exhaust components, causing it to melt and leak fluid.


The melted line can prevent you from shifting gears, but a bigger concern is the potential for the leak to cause a fire. The brake fluid used in the clutch circuit can accumulate under the hood near heat sources and smoke, or catch fire.

The recall only affects 2024 Mustangs equipped with manual transmissions. Image: Kyle Patrick

Ford became aware of this issue on April 30, 2024, after reviewing two reports of underhood fires in manual-equipped 2024 Mustangs. The Critical Concern Review Group at Ford investigated these incidents and identified the cause. Ford has acknowledged two additional reports of fires and one of smoke that may be related to this issue.


Ford says it is not aware of any injuries or accidents stemming from the defect. The automaker will begin notifying affected Mustang owners by mail starting June 17.


The recall campaign will instruct owners to visit a local dealership where a service technician will inspect the clutch pressure line and perform the necessary repairs.


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Michael Accardi
Michael Accardi

An experienced automotive storyteller known for engaging and insightful content. Michael also brings a wealth of technical knowledge and experience having been part of the Ford GT program at Multimatic and built cars that raced in TCR, IMSA, and IndyCar.

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