Average Fuel Economy Remains Unchanged in March

Average Fuel Economy Remains Unchanged in March

The average fuel economy of new vehicles sold in March remains unchanged at 25.3 mpg.

Data from researchers Michael Sivak and Brandon Schoettle of the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute shows that average fuel economy remains unchanged from the revised February 2016 value. Overall, fuel economy is down 0.5 mpg from its peek in August 2014, but is still up 5.2 mpg since October 2007, when Sivak and Schoettle first started monitoring the data.

The average sales-weighted fuel economy is calculated from the monthly sales of individual light-duty vehicles (cars, SUVs, vans and pickup trucks) and the combined fuel economy ratings published by the EPA for the respective models.

SEE ALSO: Average U.S. Fuel Economy Flat this Year: Report

For the year, the average fuel economy of new vehicles sold has remained steady, reporting 25.2 mpg in January and 25.3 mpg in February and March. Last year’s high came in May when the average fuel economy of new vehicles sold reached 25.5.

In addition, the University of Michigan Eco-Driving Index (EDI) found that the average new-vehicle driver produced 16-percent lower emissions in January 2016 than in October 2007, but six-percent higher emissions than the record low recorded in August 2014. The EDI takes into account both vehicle fuel economy and distance driven, relying on data that is published with a two-month lag.

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