Ford’s EcoBoost Police Interceptors Outrun Competition

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Ford’s EcoBoost Police Interceptors Outrun Competition
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Strong acceleration is important, it’s useful when merging onto a crowded expressway or towing a heavy trailer through the mountains. Speed is especially important for police vehicles as it gives law enforcement officers the power to take down bad guys. But who has the fastest cop car?

The 2014 Dodge Charger Pursuit AWD posted the fastest lap time at the Michigan State Police’s Vehicle Evaluation Test. With 370 horsepower courtesy of a 5.7-liter Hemi V8 it clocked in with a time of 1:33:85 at Grattan Raceway in Belding, Michigan.

It also posted a zero to 60 mile an hour romp of less than six seconds. Braking was equally stellar. The car took just 127 feet to eradicate a velocity of one mile per minute. The Charger is an impressive machine but the folks at Ford are saying not so fast.

Supposedly the Blue Oval’s twin-turbocharged EcoBoost V6-powered Taurus Police Interceptor is even quicker than its Chrysler counterpart. Supposedly it can scoot from a standstill to 60 MPH in less than 5.7 seconds, making it fleeter than either the Charger or Chevrolet’s municipal-grade Caprice.

SEE ALSO: 2014 Dodge Charger Pursuit is America’s Fastest Cop Car

In the blitz to 100 the Ford is also faster than its rivals, reaching triple digits in 13.5 seconds. The Dodge needed an additional 1.2 seconds to accomplish the same feat; the Chevrolet was 0.85 seconds slower.

Ford’s Police Interceptor Utility Vehicle (Explorer) is also quicker than its main rival, the Chevy Tahoe. It beat its bow-tie competitor in both zero to 60 and from zero to 100 mile-an-hour sprints.

The reality is that all three of these vehicles are fast, and probably significantly quicker and more economical than the aging Ford Crown Victoria, which has been a staple of police departments for decades. The Taurus may be faster than its rivals, but its lead is slim.

Discuss this story at our Ford forum.

  • LanceHardenburg

    …which has been a staple* of police departments for decades…