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RAM 1500 Becomes Industry-First Half-Ton Diesel Pickup

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Recently emancipated and breaking new ground, Chrysler’s Ram pickup truck brand just announced that the RAM 1500 pickup truck will be available this year with a diesel V6. 

When they arrive in the third quarter of 2013 as a 2014 model, it will be the first time a light-duty pickup truck is sold with a diesel engine.

“Truck owners have been emphatically asking for it, and Ram will be the only manufacturer to offer a diesel powertrain in the half-ton segment with the 2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel,” said Ram CEO Fred Diaz.

SEE ALSO: 2013 RAM 1500 Rated Best-in-Class 18/25 MPG

A 3.0-liter diesel engine will be fitted to an eight-speed automatic transmission and is expected to offer best-in-class fuel efficiency ad torque. Chrysler hasn’t released official output figures for the diesel Ram 1500 yet, but this is the same engine Jeep will soon offer in the Grand Cherokee. In that application, it offers 420 lb-ft of torque, can tow up to 7,400 lbs and is said to manage 30 mpg on the highway.

“The half-ton truck market is incredibly competitive, and although we’re honored the Ram 1500 has received a number of prestigious awards, we cannot rest on what we have accomplished, we must keep pushing,” Diaz said.

Correction: the RAM 1500 will be the industry’s only diesel half-ton, but not the industry’s first.

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154 Comments

6btpwr says:

Finally! Whoot!

Reid says:

Total Lies, 1995 Chevy 1500 6.5 Diesel.

Travis Dietz says:

I agree total lies, Chevy has built a half ton diesel from 1982 through 1999

Logan says:

And going Italian??? Absolutely enraging…

Schausindustries says:

Crap! My 6.7L cummins pushin an 11000lbs truck gets 25.5 mpg with six 33″ tires. Will be even better once I install my airdog 150.

ram tech says:

no it don’t

Muleskinner says:

If they keep the cost under 27K and put in a five speed manual, I believe they’ve got a winner. Also, Toyota sold diesel powered half-ton pickups in the early 80’s. I bought one, and it is a helluva good truck, but a little underpowered. It appears as if the upcoming Dodge will have a more powerful engine.

Al says:

I have wanted a durable, cost-effective 1/2 ton diesel truck forever. The upcoming Nissan Titan with a Cummins 5.0 seems very promising, but I am just not a fan of Japanese pickups which I have always found disappointing though they obviously make a lot of great cars as validated by their sales numbers. I currently own a ford ecoboost f-150, but while it is a comfortable and quiet truck my mpg never gets above 17 and that’s with a 2wd version and no load what-so-ever. I understand the next RAM 1500 will get a VM diesel, but frankly I suspect the Fiat diesel will get a lot of bad press once it is officially released and true performance figures are released. What appeals to Europeans is often something Americans despise. Now if the folks at RAM would only look to Cummins for a 1/2 ton power-plant the world would be right again. What arrogance by our auto manufactures to presume they know better than we what is in our best interest purchased by our hard-earned money. Isn’t it a basic tenant of sales that the customer is always right when it comes to spending his or her money! Chrysler/Fiat listen please and don’t arrogantly presume. You won’t win that argument with your customers.

Andrew says:

GM started putting diesels in their light duty half tons around 1980 as the 5.7 liter, then 6.2 liter in early 80’s. 6.5 L was available in GM half ton trucks from 94 or 95, until late 90’s.

GM Diesel Guy says:

This story should be redacted or edited. GM offered 6.2ltr diesels in their half tons in the 80s and the 6.5ltr turbo diesel in the 90s.

Dodge says:

Dodge did this in the 70’s with the Perkins diesel

Dproctor173 says:

Actually you have all forgotten that the International R-110 series pickup line was offered with both Cummins and Buda diesel engines all the way back in 1953 (of course these engines were not popular and did not achieve good power or mileage). Either way the article is very misleading in nature.